6 Ingredient Instant Pot Pear Applesauce

Sweet and tart, this homemade Pear Applesauce is such a delicious snack that is sure to hit the spot.  Ready in under 10 minutes, this quick and healthy snack is the perfect one to make during the holiday hustle. 

Are Apple Skins Okay for IBD?

Apples, and particularly the skin of apples, are a rich source of polyphenols, a type of antioxidant that protects your body’s cells from damage by harmful molecules (or free radicals). 

Keep in mind that the insoluble fiber-rich skin of apples can be harsh on the digestive system and should be removed during a flare.  Once the skin is removed from apples, the remaining soluble fiber called “pectin” gently aids in digestion by firming up loose bowel movements, making apples a great choice for IBD warriors.  

To get the best nutritional benefit from apples, we encourage you to leave the skin on when possible (when not experiencing a flare) as it provides half of the apple’s fiber and almost all of the polyphenols. 

Nutritional Benefits at a Glance 

Apples:

Apples contain a variety of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that contribute to the fruit’s numerous health benefits.  They are a great source of Vitamin C, copper, potassium, and Vitamin K. 

Apples, and particularly the skin of apples, are a rich source of polyphenols, a type of antioxidant that protects your body’s cells from damage by harmful molecules (or free radicals). 

Pears:

Pears are an excellent source of fiber, Vitamin C, and potassium.  One medium sized pear offers 8% the Daily Value of Vitamin C and 4% the Daily Value of potassium! 

Similarly to apples, it is important to remove the insoluble fiber – rich skin during a flare.  The soluble fiber which remains will still provide you with a significant health benefit. 

Lemon Juice:

Lemons are a good source of Vitamin C, which promotes immunity and aids in wound healing.  The acidity of lemons also helps to break down food and promotes digestive health! 

Cinnamon:

Cinnamon is an antioxidant powerhouse! Flavonoids, the most abundant form of antioxidants present in cinnamon, are highly effective at relieving inflammation throughout the body. 

Did You Have a Bountiful Fall Harvest?

Look no further than this Pressure Cooker Pear Applesauce. This recipe can be made in large quantities, perfect for canning and preserving. Enjoy this healthful applesauce made with pears all year long. 

We recommend canning in 1-pint quantities as you’ll want to finish the jar within 3 days of opening it. 

The two best methods for canning this pear applesauce are water-bath canning and pressure canning. 

Water bath canning instructions can be found here:

https://www.ballmasonjars.com/water-bath-canning.html

Pressure canning instructions can be found here:

https://www.ballmasonjars.com/pressure-canning.html

Can This Pear Applesauce be Prepared on the Stove? 

Don’t own a pressure cooker? Not a problem. This Pear Applesauce can be prepared on the stove!  It’s just as simple, requiring only a bit more time.  

How to Make this Recipe in a Pan

Add all ingredients to a pan with a lid, like a Dutch oven, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer until apples and pears are tender,  about 30 minutes.  Mash or puree the fruit mixture as desired (a potato masher, food processor, or immersion blender are all great options). 

An up close image of a mason jar filled with applesauce, surrounded by apples, pears, and cinnamon sticks on a checkered red and white cloth

6 Ingredient Instant Pot Pear Applesauce

Robin Phipps and Danielle Gaffen, MS, RDN, LD
Sweet and tart, this homemade Pear Applesauce is such a delicious snack that is sure to hit the spot.  Ready in under 10 minutes, this quick and healthy snack is the perfect one to make during the holiday hustle.
Total Time 20 mins
Course Dessert, Snack
Cuisine American, Mediterranean
Servings 6 Servings
Calories 100 kcal

Equipment

  • 1 Instant Pot or Pressure Cooker

Ingredients
  

  • 3 apples seeds removed, roughly chopped
  • 3 pears seeds removed, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2  tbsps lemon juice
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon

Instructions
 

  • Add all of the ingredients to the pressure cooker and close the lid
  • Set to “sealing”, then press manual/pressure cooker and cook for 5 minutes on high pressure. Once it is done, release pressure manually. Remove the lid carefully and let the applesauce cool slightly
  • Transfer everything to a blender and blend until smooth, allowing space for the heat to escape. Enjoy!

Notes

Leftovers
Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to three days.
Serving Size
One serving is approximately 1/2 cup of applesauce.
Fruit
Gala apples and Bosc pears were used for this recipe. Fruit can be peeled if desired.
More Flavor
Add other warming spices like nutmeg or pumpkin pie spice.

Nutrition

Serving: 0.5cupCalories: 100kcalCarbohydrates: 27gProtein: 1gSodium: 2mgPotassium: 207mgFiber: 5gSugar: 18gVitamin A: 72IUVitamin C: 10mgCalcium: 17mg
Keyword AIP diet-friendly, dessert, egg-free, gluten-free, kosher, low-glycemic, nut-free, oil-free, Paleo, pureed, SCD diet-friendly, snack, soy-free, sugar-free, vegan, vegetarian-friendly

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About the Author

Danielle Gaffen, MS, RDN, LD

Danielle Gaffen, MS, RDN, LD

Understanding the link between nutrition and gut disease prompted me to obtain my master’s degree in Nutritional Sciences at San Diego State University and become an IBD Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. Now I work with people who have Crohn’s and colitis who are struggling with confusion around what to eat. My favorite part is helping them to build confidence to eat without fear while managing their symptoms.

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