Spiced Almond Milk Smoothie

Are you looking for a quick and simple smoothie with anti-inflammatory ingredients? If so, then this recipe is for you! Packed with lots of nutrients, this smoothie can be a great addition to breakfast or a mid-afternoon snack.

Check out the nutritional benefits of the ingredients used in this recipe below:

Nutritional Benefits at a Glance:

Non-Dairy Milk:

My husband with Crohn’s disease is lactose intolerant, so I make this recipe using oat milk. If you’d prefer a lower carb, non-dairy milk that is easy to make at home, then almond milk might be the option for you. If you’d like greater depth to your plant-based milk, then hazelnut milk may be worth a try. This milk has both sweet and savory notes, and is creamy, too!

Please note: fortified non-dairy milks can be a good source of vitamins and minerals like calcium (meaning nutrients like calcium were added to a food that normally doesn’t contain them), but if you choose to make a homemade non-dairy milk, it won’t contain fortified vitamins and minerals.

Eat Well Crohn’s Colitis (EWCC) Sweet Blend Spice:

The secret ingredient for this smoothie is the anti-inflammatory Sweet Blend. This delicate, warm spice blend is made of ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, and cloves: all antioxidant powerhouses! Not only will these ingredients contribute to lowering inflammation, but this spice blend will add depth and elevate your recipe to a whole new level.

Honey:

Honey may be easier to digest for those with IBD. Honey is also being recognized as a potential prebiotic, since it can promote the growth of two types of “good” bacteria in the gut, lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. It also has antiomicrobial properties that can work together with probiotics against certain pathogens. Finally, honey has a lower glycemic index than regular table sugar.

Please note: Too much honey may not be recommended during episodes of diarrhea due to the high fructose content (which can cause more gastric distress). Additionally, people with diabetes should be aware that even though honey is a natural sugar and has a lower glycemic index than regular table sugar, it will still cause blood sugar levels to increase.

Bananas:

Bananas are a good source of vitamins and minerals such as potassium, magnesium, copper, manganese, vitamin B6, and vitamin C. Ripe bananas (with spots) are recommended for this recipe, not only for their sweeter flavor, but because they may be easier to tolerate by people with IBD than less ripe bananas.

An up close image of the spiced banana almond milk smoothie.

Spiced Banana Almond Milk Smoothie

Danielle Gaffen, MS, RDN, LD & Debbie Kornberg
This is a delicious smoothie for breakfast on the go or as a mid-day snack. Packed with lots of nutrients and will give you a boost of energy.
Total Time 5 mins
Course Breakfast, brunch, Dessert, Drinks, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine American
Servings 4 servings
Calories 95 kcal

Equipment

  • Blender

Ingredients
  

  • 4 cups unsweetened almond milk preferably with only almonds & water
  • 1 medium banana preferably with spots
  • 2 Tbsp honey
  • 1 tsp EWCC Sweet Blend* see notes section for more info

Instructions
 

  • Place all ingredients into a blender and mix well.

Notes

Storage
Keeps for 1 – 2 days but mix well if it has been sitting.
*Eat Well Crohn’s Colitis (EWCC) Sweet Blend
The secret ingredient for this smoothie is the anti-inflammatory Sweet Blend. This delicate, warm spice blend is made of ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, and cloves: all antioxidant powerhouses! Not only will these ingredients contribute to lowering inflammation, but this spice blend will add depth and elevate your recipe to a whole new level.

Nutrition

Serving: 4servingsCalories: 95kcalCarbohydrates: 24.9gProtein: 2gFat: 4.3gSodium: 87mgPotassium: 163mgFiber: 0.7gVitamin C: 0.5mgIron: 0.7mg
Keyword Crohn’s disease-friendly, dairy-free, gluten-free, SCD diet-friendly, ulcerative colitis-friendly, vegan-friendly, vegetarian-friendly

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About the Author

Danielle Gaffen, MS, RDN, LD

Danielle Gaffen, MS, RDN, LD

Understanding the link between nutrition and gut disease prompted me to obtain my master’s degree in Nutritional Sciences at San Diego State University and become an IBD Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. Now I work with people who have Crohn’s and colitis who are struggling with confusion around what to eat. My favorite part is helping them to build confidence to eat without fear while managing their symptoms.

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